After 17 years working on ambulances as an advanced care paramedic, Kosick has been a 911 dispatcher for the last six years after a back injury meant she couldn’t “work the streets.”

Delivering a baby over the phone “is a completely different experience,” says Kosick, who delivered four babies in her 17 years working on ambulances and has been involved in several deliveries through her headset.

“You have to go by what people tell you and what you hear in the room,” she says.

“Panic is contagious, but so is calm,” she says, adding that dispatchers are trained to use “repetitive persistence” with phrases like “I need you to be calm in order to assist you.”

Step 2: Get comfortable

Eby and Coubrough advise removing the woman’s lower clothing and having her lie flat. 

“That way, if the baby comes out, it doesn’t have anywhere to fall,” says Eby. 

Dispatchers will direct the person on the phone to collect plenty of dry towels or blankets to keep the baby warm once it is born.

Step 3: Try to wait or time to push?

After consulting your midwife or obstetrician to confirm that labour has begun, panting can slow the progression of the baby while midwives or paramedics respond.

“If you have an uncontrollable urge to push, stop and have a look to see if the baby is crowning,” says Eby. 

Crowning is the medical term for the head exiting the vagina. 

Read more at cbc.ca