Romantic Decor- 5 Key Lessons From Jessica McClintock From Her In her 2007 Book " Simply Romantic Decorating

Jessica Mc Clintock has been known for more than 4 decades for designing romantic wedding gowns and flashy prom dresses.  The designer started her business at age 38, and at it’s height, Jessica McClintock had 41 stores, and a reported $100 million in annual sales.  In November of 2013, McClintock decided to retire and license out her prom and bridal lines, but keep her home and perfume collections. Her home collection, shown at American Drew, (an extension of Lazy Boy), features a line which resonates around the richly ornamented pieces found in Italy.

In her 2007 book ” Simply Romantic Decorating Jessica Mc Clintock” reveals 15 illustrated “do-it-yourself projects“.  Here are 5 of my favorites:

Carved Decorations For Above Mantels, Doors And Windows

Trumeau is the decorative treatment of the space over a mantel, door, or window, consisting of a mirror or painting, popular during the Louis XV and Louis XVI periods.

Salvage yards and large antique malls often stock carved wood decorative elements of all kinds.  You can create a stunning trumeau mirror using a wooden door, or a sheet of plywood, and an existing wood picture frame.  Consider making your own decorative elements that appear French or Swedish using pine doors, or window frames from your local salvage yard.  Decorative appliques, such as swags, roses, bell flowers can be added to add a romantic edge to your creations.

Add Floral Hand Painted Details To Your Floors

Floors are often a forgotten decorative element of a room.   Floors can be dressed up by hand painting floral patterns using stencils.   Wooden floors can also be stripped, and white washed. Consider creating a 5- or 6-inch border around the room or an all-over pattern of small flowers or ribbons. A center medallion on a wood floor entryway would also be very appealing.  If you are not skilled at hand-painting, you can use stencils, decals, or simply add detail around the edges of an otherwise plain floor.

Glaze Your Walls For An Old World Effect

Antiquing glaze is a transparent coating that mutes a painted finish and adds a hint of without being obvious.  Glaze comes in a clear or milky formula which can be mixed with existing paint, or pre-mixed at a hardware store.  The beauty of glazed walls can remind a person of the old estates in Italy, Sweden and France.  The best results look natural, as if the walls have naturally aged to a pale, warm patina.

You never want to look at a glazed wall and say, “Oh look, a faux finish.” In fact, the effect should
be so subtle that you don’t really notice the various layers of color.

Painting and glazing a wall takes several layers of color, and is hardly a weekend project. One room may take you a week or more to complete. The best results happen when a homeowner isn’t in a rush.  Ideally, you want to do one layer at a time, and the end result should have at least three to four shades of the same paint tone, working from darker colors to lighter tones on top of the base coat.

Hand Paint Motifs On Your Walls

Hand painted designs over glazed walls can really add a romantic feel to a room.  Consider adding a  swag or flowering vine. You can use a stencil, but tracing a pattern on to a wall and filling it in with paint achieves a better painted result.

Directions

1. Select An Image and Have It Enlarged On A Copier, or A Transparency.   Choose something fairly simple such as flowers, or a swag of foliage and fruit.   Stay away from animal or  human figures which can be challenging even to the experienced artist.

2. Use Painter’s Tape To Fix The Transfer Or Graphite Paper To The Wall-   With a pencil, trace in all the lines with a pencil, and when you lift up the paper, using graphite transfer sheets, the image should be transferred to the wall.  Using an overhead projector, you can simply transfer the image using a pencil.  As you move along, you simply move the overhead projector around the room.

3. Begin To Paint. Fill in all large areas first and then work on fine lines. Don’t worry too much about perfection, because the end result will be sanded slightly and glazed, which will  blur any errors or stray lines and create an aged, antique, romantic look.  When you are done and the paint has completely dried, lightly sand the painting to soften the color, which is best done after the paint has dried a day or two.  Use fine-grit sandpaper or a new, clean white scrubber, often used on pots and pans, and don’t rub too hard.

4. Add One Final Coat Of Glaze.  Adding one last coat of glaze on the walls will further blur the overall image.  You can have your paint pre-mixed, and simply use a roller and go over the entire wall.  This step often blends together all the work, and gives it a subtle appearance.

Add Patina To Your Mirrors

Fix up your existing mirrors to make them appear older than they are.  Most new mirrors have a flat gray protective coating over the covering of the glass.  You have to remove most of this to age the mirror. Use protective rubber gloves and pour some paint stripper into a plastic dish, and then use the 2-inch paintbrush to paint it onto the back of the mirror, covering most of the glass.
Eventually the surface blisters and bubbles, and at that point, you can take off the backing with a plastic putty knife. The paint remover will take off only the gray backing, revealing the mirror’s silver leafing.

You don’t have to remove every inch of the gray backing, but you should have removed most of it.
After the mirror is cleaned with soap and warm water, dry it off using a lint free cloth.  Pour some of the metal patina solution into a plastic dish and soak a kitchen sponge with water and set it aside.

Pour a moderate amount of the patina solution onto the sea sponge and dab it onto the silver leafing. The silver leafing will begin to corrode immediately; as soon as it has achieved the desired effect, pat the sponge soaked in water over the silver leafing to stop the chemical reaction, otherwise it will eat straight through the silver finish.

To seal the back of the mirror, paint four layers of gold, copper or black paint over the “antiqued” silver leafing, allowing each coat to dry fully. Gold paint will create a sepia tone, copper will appear rusted, and black will give it a charcoal feel.

Once the black paint is completely dry, reframe the mirror and hang it up.

Romantic Decor- 5 Key Lessons From Jessica McClintock From Her In her 2007 Book " Simply Romantic Decorating

Hand Painted Floor And Stenciling Ideas From Jessica McClintock

Romantic Decor- 5 Key Lessons From Jessica McClintock From Her In her 2007 Book " Simply Romantic Decorating

Patina Old Mirrors – Jessica McClintock

Romantic Decor- 5 Key Lessons From Jessica McClintock From Her In her 2007 Book " Simply Romantic Decorating

Ornate Mirrors – Jessica McClintock

Romantic Decor- 5 Key Lessons From Jessica McClintock From Her In her 2007 Book " Simply Romantic Decorating

Furniture Patina – Jessica McClintock

Romantic Decor- 5 Key Lessons From Jessica McClintock From Her In her 2007 Book " Simply Romantic Decorating

Painted Italian,  French Furniture, Gathered Balloon Shades From Jessica McClintock

Romantic Decor- 5 Key Lessons From Jessica McClintock From Her In her 2007 Book " Simply Romantic Decorating

Decorating With Lace And Draping, Cane Chairs From Jessica McClintock

Romantic Decor- 5 Key Lessons From Jessica McClintock From Her In her 2007 Book " Simply Romantic Decorating

Heavily Distressed Raw Wood Furniture From Jessica McClintock

Romantic Decor- 5 Key Lessons From Jessica McClintock 8

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