In 2015, Dr. Yao was the lead author of “Neonatal vaccination with bacillus Calmette–Guérin and hepatitis B vaccines modulates hippocampal synaptic plasticity in rats,” the first study that ever looked at the impact ANY vaccine might have on the brains of rats.

A Summary Of The Findings:

1. The HBV vaccine negatively impacted the behavior of mice.

Specifically, the HBV mice (those that were vaccinated with Hepatitis B vaccine) showed a “significant decrease in locomotion” and “increased anxiety.”

2. The HBV vaccine mice experienced a spike in the cytokine IL-6.

The authors noted that the HBV mice showed “significantly increased” IL-6, which we know is a biomarker for autism.

3. It took time for the neurological impact of HBV vaccine to manifest.

This troubled the study authors. They discussed the “latency,” meaning the extensive time between when the mice were vaccinated and when the neurological disorders presented themselves (note that Hepatitis B vaccine trials in infants typically followed the infants for one week or less to monitor adverse events):

“…the significant difference found in the present study is between the immunized mice and the control mice, rather than between the mice of 8-week-old and the mice of another age. Therefore, this difference does reflect the effects of the neonatal vaccination. The mechanism underlying the latency and transient phenomenon is very complex and needs further studies for well understanding, because such latency involves many aspects of the immune responses in the periphery and CNS as well as neural plasticity.”

4. They concluded with a statement that, in a sane world, would prompt the immediate cessation of Hepatitis B vaccine administration to babies.

What can I say, just read what they wrote for yourself:

“This work reveals for the first time that early HBV vaccination induces impairments in behavior and hippocampal neurogenesis. This work provides innovative data supporting the long suspected potential association of HBV with certain neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism and multiple sclerosis.”

Read more at healthimpactnews.com