“Doctors long believed that infants do not feel pain the way that older children and adults do. Instead, they believed that the infants’ responses to discomfort were reflexes. Based on these beliefs, it was a routine practice to perform surgery on infants without suitable pain relief up until the late 1980s.”

Researchers discovered that when 1-6 day old babies were exposed to the same pain stimulus as adults their brains “lit up” in almost exactly the same manner.

What is deeply concerning about this finding is that infants have long been considered by the conventional medical profession to be  incapable of experiencing pain while undergoing the many routine medical procedures to which they are exposed in early life. In the case of the smallest and sickest of babies (who are required to be in a level 3 neonatal intensive unit for the first 14 days of their lives), a 2014 study found that they experience an average of 11.4 painful medical procedures a day, but with only 36.6% receiving pain management therapy.

Additionally, with the increasing prevalence of obstetrician-assisted birth (C-sections), blood draws, and vaccination, the experience of iatrogenic pain and trauma has become the norm, and not the exception.

Read more about this at greenmedinfo.com