6/21/17

On Wednesday, the EU’s top court said that a vaccine could be considered defective if there is “specific and consistent evidence,” including the time between a vaccine’s administration and the occurrence of a disease, the individual’s previous state of health, the lack of any family history of the disease and a significant number of reported cases of the disease occurring following vaccination.

​Each chosen point listed by the court for its consideration spells bad news for the European vaccine industry. Ample evidence can be regularly found regarding a vaccination being the culprit for an individual’s slide into one of many specific ill-health conditions listed on the vaccine’s patient information leaflet. The EU court case was carryed over from a French case of a man who was immunized against hepatitis B in late 1998-99. About a year later Mr. J.W., as he is referred to in the documents, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. In 2006, he and his family sued vaccine-maker Sanofi Pasteur in an attempt to be compensated for the damage they claim he suffered due to the vaccine. Mr. J.W. died in 2011.

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